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David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” Recreated As Children’s Book

ComicsAlliance readers should by now be familiar with the work of Andrew Kolb. We’ve spotlighted the illustrator’s work a couple of times before, first for his groovy representations of The Walking Dead and other beloved artifacts of pop culture, and most recently for his work with some of comics, film and television’s most famous double-acts like The Muppets’ Bunson and Beaker and Kevin Smith’s Jay and Silent Bob, but in the style of carved wooden blocks.

Kolb’s latest work is more ambitious, telling the story of David Bowie’s classic “Space Oddity” in the style of an illustrated children’s book. The tale of doomed Major Tom plays out in Kolb’s bright and retro animation style, giving a face to the legendary Bowie character and making the conclusion that much sadder. 

Released in 1969 and considered a classic today, David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” is obviously a reference to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Like the film, Bowie’s song tells the story of an isolated astronaut whose life is threatened by a malfunction. Unfortunately for Bowie’s Major Tom, the character’s ultimate fate is decidedly grimmer than that of Kubrick’s Dave Bowman (Unless you want to get into Bowie’s “Ashes to Ashes” or the Pet Shop Boys remix of “Hallo Spaceboy” or the Peter Schilling fanfiction of “Coming Home”) 

If Bowie’s telling of the story sounds a bit dire from the start, Kolb’s reinterpretation is decidedly optimistic. Kolb’s illustrations also take their cues from that 1960s vision of the future seen in Kubrick’s films, but with the artist’s distinctly cheerful vibe that humanizes every aspect of the story, not the least of which are Major Tom’s space capsule and Ground Control themselves. Everything looks shiny and new, everybody is smiling and happy, and there’s no reason to think anything is going to go wrong. But of course it does, and in a way that fans of Bowie’s song will find quite clever. Without giving too much away, Kolb looked to the curious lyric, “And the stars look very different today” as a way to depict what exactly went wrong far above the moon.

Read the entire book at ComicsAlliance.

Filed under comics music art Illustration

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comicsalliance:


Steve Rolston has drawn a bunch of comics such as Queen & Country, Pounded, Mek, The Escapists, Tales of the TMNT, Degrassi, Emiko Superstar and, most recently, the supernatural thriller Ghost Projekt. He also wrote & illustrated the slacker noir graphic novel One Bad Day. His website is www.steverolston.comDave McCaig colors things. He has used red, green and many other hues on Action Comics, X-Men, Avengers, Detective Comics, Northlanders, American Vampire, and countless other titles. He also runs Gutterzombie.com, the colorist message board.Steve says: When coming up with ideas for this cover, I obviously had to think about what story I would tell if I got to do a series about the character Death. In a nutshell, it involves a young woman who realizes that a near-death experience in her youth left her with more than just emotional scars and hazy memories of a pale girl with a silver ankh around her neck. She discovers that, unlike most in the mortal realm, she has the ability to see the entity known as Death. And now a mysterious occultist wants to cut out her eyeballs and take that power for himself.The hat that Death wears in the painting is a reference to la Calavera Catrina, an elegant female skeleton figure often portrayed in Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebrations.Death was created by Neil Gaiman and Mike Dringenberg.

From DC Fifty-Too.

They are making Death comics again?
This is all I need to hear about anything.

comicsalliance:

Steve Rolston has drawn a bunch of comics such as Queen & Country, Pounded, Mek, The Escapists, Tales of the TMNT, Degrassi, Emiko Superstar and, most recently, the supernatural thriller Ghost Projekt. He also wrote & illustrated the slacker noir graphic novel One Bad Day. His website is www.steverolston.com

Dave McCaig colors things. He has used red, green and many other hues on Action Comics, X-Men, Avengers, Detective Comics, Northlanders, American Vampire, and countless other titles. He also runs Gutterzombie.com, the colorist message board.

Steve says: When coming up with ideas for this cover, I obviously had to think about what story I would tell if I got to do a series about the character Death. In a nutshell, it involves a young woman who realizes that a near-death experience in her youth left her with more than just emotional scars and hazy memories of a pale girl with a silver ankh around her neck. She discovers that, unlike most in the mortal realm, she has the ability to see the entity known as Death. And now a mysterious occultist wants to cut out her eyeballs and take that power for himself.

The hat that Death wears in the painting is a reference to la Calavera Catrina, an elegant female skeleton figure often portrayed in Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebrations.

Death was created by Neil Gaiman and Mike Dringenberg.


From DC Fifty-Too.

They are making Death comics again?

This is all I need to hear about anything.

Filed under comics art Illustration